Category: Reading

Featured Author: Michael Haase

Today The Warbler features Michael Haase, whose book, The Madness of Mr. Butler, looks like an interesting pseudo-Galilean tale in an absolutely fascinating setting. Read selected entries from Mr. Butler’s journal that he kept prior to the events chronicled in the novel at The Diary of Mr. Butler. About the book:  The Madness of Mr. Butler is a

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Redshirts – John Scalzi

I’ve been meaning to read the work of mega-prolific writer John Scalzi for quite a while, and was never able to get around to it, despite having purchased several of his novels last year. Then, by a happy chance, audible.com had Redshirts available for less than $5 during their Black Friday sale and I thought,

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Featured Author: Jason Chestnut

Author Jason Chestnut (Facebook, Twitter) is today’s featured Inkshares / Nerdist contest entrant. His book, To Live and Die in Avalon, looks absolutely wonderful. I am definitely getting this one. About the book: On New Year’s Day in the year 1970, the planet Earth was scorched and made uninhabitable by a mysterious alien terrorist force known only

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Featured Author: RH Webster

Today, The Warbler is glad to feature RH Webster, another contestant in the Inkshares / Nerdist contest. Her novel, Lucky, sounds like a wonderful space-romance. Check it out! About the book: This novel is everything a reader could want from a space opera: space ships, romance, mystery, bar brawls, and a high speed car chase! Lucky is

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Featured Author: Patrick Jamison

Inkshares is running another contest with the Nerdist, so I wanted to take the opportunity to introduce the work of a fellow author. Without further warbling, here’s Patrick Jamison’s Infinity Mind. About the book: Mason is a non-violent protester against the dictatorial government of Raquel Velasquez, the reigning leader of El Dorado, the oldest and most

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Lurk – Adam Vine

After reading The Monstrous, a collection of horror shorts edited by Ellen Datlow, I fancied myself reborn; a fan of a new genre. So when Adam Vine emailed me asking if I’d review his debut horror novel, Lurk, I was quick to accept. Here’s the thing I learned from my second foray into the genre:

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The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle – Haruki Murakami

I’ve now put a second Haruki Murakami novel on my “read” shelf, and while I have several more to work through, I think I’ve read enough to form a solid impression of his work. I’m looking forward to reading the others, but for the time being I can comfortably say that he’s an incredible writer.

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Collected Fiction – Hannu Rajaniemi

  There’s just something about Scandinavia, I guess. Tachyon published a collection Finnish Author Hannu Rajaniemi’s short stories last year, and while (I believe) it is sold out everywhere, it’s well worth finding a used copy so that you can experience what it might’ve been like if Knausgaard wrote science fiction. While Rajaniemi isn’t quite

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Physics: A Short History from Quintessence to Quarks – John Heilbron

In Physics: A Short History from Quintessence to Quarks, John Heilbron sets himself an ambitious task: to cover some 2500 years of scientific development in a few hundred pages. Thinking about non-fiction in terms of pacing seems odd, but one of the things I thought about most while reading Physics was that it was moving

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Between the World and Me – Ta-Nehisi Coates

Writing about a book as monumental, as vital, as shattering as Between the World and Me is a difficult task. For all its difficulty, it is drop against a universe’s weight in water compared to the difficulty with which it deals, the difficulty MacArthur genius Ta-Nehisi Coates faced in living and writing it. It’s difficult

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